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Same file extension, different grammar rules

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  • Aaron
    replied
    Sure thing, Michael. Thanks for sharing.

    I'll write up a wishlist entry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Bulgrien
    replied
    If I have .txt files that need to be compared with modified SQL grammar rules, and other .txt files that need to be compared with modified XML grammar rules, and other .txt files that need to be compared with yet completely different variation of XML grammar rules, it would be easier to get it all working automagically if one could define file formats using a regex file mask. That's all I'm saying. It's not a high priority item on my personal wish list, but it would be a useful feature if it were implemented some day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aaron
    replied
    Is the SQL code text filter in flux? My suggestion assumes a static "specialized .txt file" with specific sql code that could be searched on. Instead of toggling any settings, this would just be setup once and loaded as a session when you needed to compare these files, or load the normal sessions when you wanted to compare "other SQL analysis." In a simple case, a session that covers Data set A (specialized) in Folder1 and Folder2, and Data set B (everything else) in Folder1 and Folder2.

    And, you can enable/disable file formats before launching a session. From the Home screen, before you double click a session, use the Session management on the right side and go to the Misc tab. Uncheck/check the SQL formats you want to use, then use the Open as New button (or Save As.)

    Do these suggestions help? If not, please let us know. If you'd like, do you have a small sample set of files you would be able to email us? Please include a link back to this forum post for reference in the email.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Bulgrien
    replied
    Thanks for your suggestion...but the whole idea is to be able to open your sessions and do your daily work without having to enable or disable file formats or having to move them up or down in the list every time a certain file type is used. A users should be able to set up the system to handle the majority of their normal work without re-tweaking between efforts. Now if the session settings could enable or disable the necessary file formats whenever the session is activated, then perhaps that would work... I doubt, however, that that would be a trivial implementation.

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  • Aaron
    replied
    How about this?:
    Would a saved Folder Compare session with the Other Filter set to Text Content (to show only these files with specialized .txt files), then set the Misc tab to use a special *.sql file format and disable the default one.

    Then in the Tools menu -> File Formats dialog, place the default one higher on the list or uncheck the specialized *.sql file format for general cases/other sessions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Bulgrien
    replied
    One example would be file names that always have a particular date/timestamp in the file name. It is a little difficult to use DOS file masks for variable elements such as that in a file name.

    In my particular case, the files are specialized .txt files containing SQL code, but need specific rules to determine which SQL elements are important and which are not. For other SQL analysis, I would not want the same grammar rules in place.

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  • Aaron
    replied
    Hello Michael,

    Thanks for the suggestion. While we do not currently support Regular Expressions, you can use slightly more complicated DOS Masking when defining additional file formats. What are some examples of file names you wish to pair up and then use different file formats on?

    One note: If one side matches one of your masks, and the right side does not and matches to default, BC3's Text Compare will open both sides using the left side's defined format. If both sides have matches, then it will use the defined match for each side.

    Leave a comment:


  • Same file extension, different grammar rules

    There are times that the same file extension is used for files that need different grammar rules. It would be nice to be able to define a file format using a regex pattern instead just plain text file extensions.
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